For Sen. Anthony Delcollo, follow-through is everything

By Joyce L. Carroll

Every Sunday, Delaware’s youngest state senator tries to carve out some downtime out of his busy schedule. Anthony Delcollo was elected to public office in the 7th district in 2016, and he maintains his private sector job. An associate attorney for Offit Kurman, he established the firm’s first Delaware office in Wilmington.

Delcollo said the law firm’s multi-location practice, which spans six states and Washington, D.C., provides the collegiality of a small office but with considerable resources. This enables colleagues to step up if his legislative schedule requires it. On the flipside, he said his talented aide is adept at keeping his legislative calendar straight.

During the legislative session, Delcollo said he works the equivalent of two full-time jobs. He sits on four committees — joint sunset and government oversight, elections and government services, labor and industrial affairs, and the education committee. He prides himself on follow-through in both his private and public roles.

Delcollo didn’t always have political aspirations. But his view of public service began with earning Eagle Scout. His early schooling also required community service. His dedication to outreach continued into college, and law school provided an opportunity to show disadvantaged youth how to advocate for themselves through discourse.

“I’ve always been interested in service, and I knew its positive impact on community,” he said.

Acceptance into Leadership Delaware in 2015, coupled with several experiences volunteering on the campaign trail for office seekers, including State Treasurer Ken Simpler, solidified his decision.

His greatest concern is Delaware’s fiscal policy. A measure of success was achieved, he said, following the signing of Executive Order 21 by Gov. John Carney late last month. Delcollo sat on the task force that had made recommendations aimed at stabilizing budget growth with a greater eye toward responsible spending.

Delcollo’s proudest moment occurred on the senate floor. “It was the first time I was on the floor of the General Assembly,” he said. “It was the first time I got to actively discuss a matter of constitutional concern. It was a pinch-me moment.”

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