When to Use New Technologies in Marketing

Jason Trojanowski
Digital Creative Director
Aloysius Butler & Clark
 

 

When it comes to new technology, marketers are often like a newborn playing with a set of keys. It’s new. It’s shiny. And we just need to have it and play with it. But, just because it is new and cool doesn’t mean that it’s the right fit, and often marketers adopt a new technology or platform just so they can scream “first!” with reckless abandon.

But being the absolute first shouldn’t really be the goal. Instead, you should focus on using new technology in a way that best suits your business needs and objectives. At Aloysius Butler & Clark, we take time to conduct research and collect data, and to include that information in our creative strategies to ensure that what we are using is right for the business and the audience. To do so, we usually ask three simple questions:

1. Am I using this just because it is cool?

You may decide to use a new technology because it looks cool and does some neat stuff, and people may even recognize your business for using it first. But that is usually the beginning and the end of being an early adopter for early adoption’s sake. There is no reason that a soup company should be using virtual reality. But a carmaker using virtual reality is a home run. The technology has to be authentic to the brand.

2. Will this have an impact on my business?

Even if it feels like the right fit, you have to weigh the investment cost with the return, or potential return. Just because a new technology seems to fit doesn’t mean it’s right for you. And at the end of the campaign or initiative, you’ll have to determine whether the investment was worth it. If you know that a new technology will motivate or move your audience to make a purchase or request more information, then it most likely will be a sound investment for your business.

3. Can you measure the outcomes?

When it comes to analytics, most new technologies are like little infants that can barely crawl. So it is best to make sure there are proper tools for measurement in place. The only way you can be certain that something has had an impact on your business is to determine if there are measurable outcomes to back it up.

Once you have asked all those questions, and feel right about the answers, then your shiny new object may just be ready to share with the world.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

With 15 years of digital experience, Jason has blended strategy, technology and design to create successful digital campaigns for some of today’s most influential brands. He has worked with many Fortune 500 clients, including Universal, NFL, Campbell’s and GE. As a multichannel pragmatist, Jason helps clients filter through the digital noise of advertising by creating websites, applications and social media programs that reach the right audiences at the right time and place. Jason received a Bachelor of Science in industrial design from University of the Arts in Philadelphia.

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